06 September 2010

Press Only: CBS Early Show



21 comments:

TRVS said...

Bravo!!

Anonymous said...

A "by-line" credit. Just noticed that. Very nice.

Bringing cool weather back, if style helps - that's what I want.

-DB

M.Lane said...

A well deserved mention! You should crack open a Chelada to celebrate!

ML
mlanesepic.blogspot.com

LPC said...

Go you!

James said...

The legend of Tin-Tin grows! Bravo for you.

Anonymous said...

Now that the book is out and nobody much likes it perhaps it's time to calm the hype.

Greg said...

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/09/06/earlyshow/living/beauty/main6839316.shtml?tag=contentBody;cbsCarousel

It's online now :) I wish the Preppy handbook would actually go back into print - it doesn't make a lot of sense why it's still out of print - after all it goes for a pretty high price for something that wasn't very obscure.

Greg said...

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/09/06/earlyshow/living/beauty/main6839316.shtml?tag=contentBody;cbsCarousel

It's online now :) I wish the Preppy handbook would actually go back into print - it doesn't make a lot of sense why it's still out of print - after all it goes for a pretty high price for something that wasn't very obscure.

those tricks said...

Dear Greg,
You are in luck.
Sit tight.

Dear Tin-Tin,
Kudos.

Ryan Bradford Dunphy said...

Congrats on the "by-line" and cheers to you. It is nice to see that "style" is fashionable. You blog is very cool and it is nice to see you get the credit you deserve for such a well worked site. I am anxious for the "True Prep" book release and love the Take Ivy. You got a very well deserved mention.

Flo Ingram/INGRAM DESIGN said...

Had the flu for about a week, stuck here at the computer in a med-head daze, but enlivened in spells by reading The Trad cover-to-cover, A to Y. Back in the beginning of this journal, you remarked that Trad had its origins in 30s Yale/Princeton, I believe it was. I look at this collegiate group photo that CBS ripped from your site and think, my gosh, they look like a bunch of slobs compared to the group photos taken of my Dad, Yale 1932. If you are correct that 1930s Yale was the locus and era of the origin of Trad, then you might like having these gems in your vault, my Dad's fraternity, honor society, eating club, football, baseball photos. When I come back to life, I'm going to scan one or two of these beauts and email them to you for your files.

La Maison Fou said...

Great balls of fire!

Congratulatory exclaimations are in order.As for the book; still have my pre-teen copy.

A side note;
mention of a weekend acquisition today on the blog,,, a find P.H. Stationary in tact........

Oh behave! Much to do on this subject...... Lot's of love out there for the madras mayhem!

Loved that read!

L.

Greg said...

Dear those tricks -

I am intrigued. Do you know something on the subject that we don't?

Anonymous said...

Greg the Preppy Handbook will be re-released but totally re-edited to be more 'inclusive' (less white)

Anonymous said...

I am so looking forward, to not being "in-style" anymore.

mike said...

give it one or two years and the trendy douchebags will be on their next kick and you can pick up the original take ivy for a few bucks and get change. by the way, the 'true prep' sucks and the re-issue of 'take ivy' is printed so cheap they might as well have used toilet paper

Greg said...

Mike: Take Ivy isn't printed that cheaply. If you are referring to the gloss paper or the photographic reproductions then I would have to agree. But you really can't complain when it's printed in China and sells for $24. I don't want to bore you to death with printing details but the letters reveal it was printed at a very high resolution. Thick glossy paper an Italian printing is reserved for premium products - and what Trad is going to pay premium price for a book you can look at for free on this very site. As for the Preppy Handbook does anybody know if there are any plans - or just speculation?

tintin said...

I had a hoot a year or so ago when I talked to a guy who had a large clothing mail order operation. He told me one of the biggest frustrations he had was dealing with Ask Andy readers. They didn't know what they wanted. They were cheap. They were demanding. THey were nightmares.

The recent critcism of the photo quality reminds me of that. Not many saw the real deal but everyone's an expert on the quality. I keep telling people the original wasn't a coffee table book. Huge amounts of image lost to binding at folds. Out of focus B&Ws. At first it was a huge disappointment but the book has a magic. And the US version is damn near perfect 'cept for some slight color shift I've mentioned.

If you get the magic - then you'll love this book. If you don't- that's ok too. But go back to it every once in a while and think of the culture that created it. And then think of how they saw it. What it must have been like for them. They were in awe of something the students took for granted.

That's what a lot of this blog is about. Being grateful and not entitled. Earning it and not just buying it. Living what you wear as well as knowing the story. Nobody is trying to sell you something with this book and that may very well be from a place not many understand.

Greg said...

Exactly Tintin - I loved the book. Yes the printing is flawed - but does it doesn't bother me. When I want to read a classic novel I make sure to purchase it from Dover - a great company that sells paperbacks with thin glossy covers that bear simple designs or patterns. The paper is pulpy, thin and yellow and the trimming is always rough. But that's the charm of Dover's books - and the best part is they cost as little as one dollar for shorter novels such as Dickens' Christmas Carol or five dollars for longer ones such as Moby Dick.

Now I could easily go to Borders and purchase a hardcover with thick perfect white pages but that's pointless. I'm content with the Dover edition - happier even. The book is about words - ideas - and no fancy edition can change those ideas. I doubt Herman Melville would want his rugged classic read in a fancy bound edition as opposed to a rugged tome. The Dover books have a charm to them and I'm grateful to read them. Take Ivy isn't perfect - but the charm justifies the means, just like the Dover books.

Christian said...

TinTin - Congratulations on the citationby CBS.

Would be interested in capturing your perspective on David Brooks' "The Genteel Nation" column in today's NYT in which he he infers that America's current malaise is the result of the abandonment of what Max Weber referred to as the Protestant Work Ethic and the Spirit of American Capitalism. Can't help but belief you have a considered opinion on this topic given the significant research you have undertaken in the realm of American Traddom.

tintin said...

Christian- Hey, thanks. Caught me with some pals having too many beers while we watch Animal House. Right in the middle of the Toga party.

I don't know anything about America's mayonnaise but I'll tell you this, Protestants almost always worked in banks -- which is to say they didn't work at all. Hey, what's the definition of a Protestant? Someone who gets out of the shower to pee.