09 November 2010

Pierrepont Hicks & The Camel Cravat











I think mixing patterns is the most fun you can have with your clothes on. The Brits do it better than anyone and I stole a lot over the years from Lionel Hardcastle in, As Time Goes By. Lionel had a thing for Tattersall check shirts and beautiful tweed and herringbone jackets. A solid wool tie calmed down the patterns considerably.

Wool ties have the texture you need but, for me, they lack character and depth. That is, they just sit there like they've had too much single malt. I've written about Pierrepont Hicks before. Kat and Mac are a married couple who put out a line of ties and bows that, while out of the box, also stay true to tradition. I've said before their ties are hip enough for Crosby Street but there's nothing dad or granddad wouldn't enjoy around their necks.

This tie, the Conrad, has that same out of box thinking. Inspired by the camel hair sport coat, the tie is solid but the texture is rich. I'd say, stone cold sober. Made in NYC, the tie literally springs off the collar. It dimples easily and looks warm on a Tattersall check. Perfect for the Winter antique's show or dinner some Fall night at the Gramarcy Tavern. Just stay away from pasta.

This is not cheaply made. To echo the camel hair sport coat lining -- the narrow blade of the tie is silk along with the self loop which is sewn into the center seam. It's also self tipped. $140 is a small price to pay for unique soul and a whole lot more interesting than Hermes or Ferragamo.

For a perfect dimple, fold the narrow end of the tie away from you and at the point you cross the larger blade over. Keep the narrow end folded until you pull the tie down through the knot. Works everytime. Go to Trad Approved for details and how to order. The tie. Not the dimple.

22 comments:

Abacus said...

To clarify, you mean to just pull the narrow blade away from you at the point where the wider blade overlaps it, as in make it stick straight out from your chest while you tie the knot?

I tried this a few times and it seems to work, but I'm not sure I know what the hell I'm doing or why. Maybe it's better that way.

tintin said...

Abacus - Sounds like you have it. Just make sure to keep the narrow end folded until you pull the larger blade down. It's tricky. Maybe I should do a video like Will.

Alice Olive said...

So on trend. Camel is so hot right now. (Although camel has always been an integral part of my wardrobe.) That tie oozes (in a quiet way) luxury.

Main Line Sportsman said...

There is a poignant moment in the movie "Outside Providence" where the character played by Alec Baldwin is teaching his son how to tie a tie. he refers to the "dimple" as the "vicious V" and he remarks how the women love it...a well tied tie.
A very funny move by the way...about bong-jockey kid from wrong side of the tracks who ends up at a Boarding School in Conn.

Anonymous said...

Last year I had several of my winter ties(wool; wool/cashmere; cashmere) narrowed to 3" by my tailor. A great update. Always get compliments when wearing them. Love my tailor.

Brandon said...

A video would do the trick nicely. I have a couple of ties which resist the dimple.

Anonymous said...

Yes, please -- a video, for we the frustrated.

tintin said...

Alice- Hot. Oozes. Integral. This should be an x-rated comment.

Main Line- Baldwin is my hero. I'll check it out. Thanks.

Anon 17:20- I know Tie Crafters in NY offers the service. I still have a few ties from the late '80s that are amazingly narrow. Even Hermes slimmed down their width.

Brandon & Anon- I think I can get it across by some pics. I'll give it a shot.

Hilton said...

"A whole lot more interesting than Hermes." I strongly concur. H-E-R-P-E-S is just baubles for the bourgeoisie such as Admiral CLOD.

ADG said...

Tang-Tang...I went to their site and was just about to pull the trigger via PayPal for one of their great bow ties. Then they hit me with nine bucks for ground shipping a bow tie. I passed.

kat + mac said...

ADG - $9 for shipping is a UPS fee. However, we have an option on our shipping page that states we'd be happy to do custom shipping for you if requested. Let us know if you'd like the bow tie without the box and shipped USPS.

Brummagem Joe said...

I've no particular animus against wool ties and sometimes they look very good but I have to say if any piece of neckwear satisfies the description of an overdose of Glenmorangie it was this one, although maybe it looks better in real life. I'm something of a Lionel follower myself but if you want to calm it down go for a knit. They come in silk, wool or mixes. Bergdorf has some great wool patterned and solid knits and if you want silk knits then Paul Stuart is the place and they are little more modestly priced than further uptown . All the texture and depth you ever need. And they go exceptionally well with a Glenmorangie.

tintin said...

ADG- Satisfied?

Kat + Mac - Thanks

Joe- I always liked your animus but not your scotch. I'm an Islay kind'a guy. I always associated Glenmorangie with the novice single malt drinker. We don't agree on much and thats okay.

Brummagem Joe said...

tintin: not being Scottish I probably am a novice but I like my malts smooth. I was introduced to it by a guy from Glasgow who claimed all the burned peat stuff was for (expletive deleted) southern (expletive deleted)trying to prove they had (expletive deleted). He meant Southern brits of course!

tintin said...

Joe- I've been drinking single malts for 20 years -- you don't have to be Scottish to know them. Most Scots drink the Grouse. I would defer to the Japanese for their knowledge and passion for single malts.

Like a Mazanilla Sherry, there is the taste of the sea I love in Islays with Laphroaig being a favorite. I would recommend a lighter Islay unless you're married to the Orange-ee.

The tie is beautiful. Perhaps my efforts with the camera have not made that clear. But I'm aware my taste is not to everyone's liking.

Brummagem Joe said...

Tintin: Despite the strictures of my Glaswegian friend I actually quite like Laphroaig although I do share his overall (expletive deleted) preference for the smoother malts. I'm sure it's a lovely tie and I have bought a couple of bows from Pierrepoint so I know their stuff is very nice. I was actually agreeing with your original comment about the limitations of wool ties but there's always the exception that proves every rule isn't there?

Brummagem Joe said...

Tintin: as an addendum to my above comment about knitted ties they really have some incredible knitted woollens in Bergdorfs particularly the checks. If you're a pattern mixer you can run wild.

tintin said...

Joe- I shop where I feel welcome which is not at Berdorfs. I haven't been in there for over a year although I do like the windows.

Brummagem Joe said...

Tintin: You made me laugh. If shop assistants and waiters with ideas above their station were a bar one couldn't go into half the decent restaurants and stores in NYC!!! I got just about the greatest shoe bargain in my life in a Bergdorf's winter sale so it's sometimes worth holding your nose. And some of those shop assistants are lookers!

tintin said...

Joe- My green beret father did not suffer fools gladly. Especially civilians licking their chops at lining their pockets with his hard earned money. It's something I picked up.

There's no reason to do business with people who care little to do business with me. Even for a deal on shoes.

I have relationships with the people I shop with. I go back to them because I want to. Kat and Mac are very much in that realm of special people.

I'mOutOfItAlready! said...

I have this tie and love it. I wear it with a narrow- to medium-width lapel on the tweedy or corderoy jacket, from the greenish/brown family, and yes, against a plaid shirt. The hand on the tie is sublime.

Tweed Jackets said...

Great tie, and the tweed jacket is very nice also!!