25 November 2010

Happy Thanksgiving

We're gonna try something a little different this year. Anybody have a wine recommendation?

20 comments:

Zach said...

Pinot does very well with ham. Whatever bottle catches your eye. Happy Ham Day, Tintin!

Giuseppe said...

Burgundy for sure, Cahors if you're feeling adventurous.

Best to you and the Golf Foxtrot.

James said...

Bourbon and branch.

brohammas said...

Not my strong suit. Wish the Golf Foxtrot well from me and eat an unreasonable amount food.

tintin said...

Zach- I took your rec and pulled a couple bottles of Domain Serene Evanstad. Even if it doesn't work - - it'll work.

Seppe- You have me on Cahors.

James- What is brach water?

Brohammas- Best to you all down south. I can't open the ginger ale bottle.

Zach said...

Oh, that'll work just fine.

Main Line Sportsman said...

On a limb here...but my German ancestors drank Riesling with Ham....or a good Pilsner.

R said...

With a country ham, I'd go for a semi-dry Riesling. The slight sweetness with slice through the salt.

R said...

I would go with a semi-dry riesling with a country ham. The slight sweetness will slice through the salt.

Branch is a vernacular for local water. Bourbon and branch would be poured with the springwater from which the bourbon is sourced.

Flo said...

Yum. Do I smell cheese grits in the oven? Happy day to you and yours, sir.

brohammas said...

When all else fails, break out the pliers... though I did read once on Easy and Elegant life how to open a bottle with a sword. Try that and let me know how it works out.

Beefeater said...

Late, I know. Was thinking Etude Pinot Noir or a Vacqueyras. Happy Thanksgiving. As for my wife, Veuve Clicquot was the route to enlightenment today.

Cheers!

Sean said...

How did the ham turn out? I tried cooking country ham once, but the ham did not cooperate.

Tin-tin's phred dad said...

Some years ago, an older woman and Virginia native, gave me an original
Smithfield as a xmas gift. I cut a piece off and pan fried it as she directed. It tasted like what it looked (and smelled)like.
Not satisfied, I put the whole thing in a large pot and simmered it for a few hours. While doing so, a friend came to visit. He walked in and the first thing he said was "What's that godawful smell?"
Once I'd leached all the curing crap off it, it was a swell and quite tasty ham.

LPC said...

I hope you had a nice Thanksgiving.

1 said...

Austrian Rieslings, Pinot Bianco Pinot Blanc, for Christmas day maybe a nice Rose Champagne.

Anonymous said...

Also, consider the possibilities of a Gewurztraminer. Sometimes with a tricky pairing, it is helpful to consider what else you are serving. The garnishes often will tip the balance of your decision.

BTW I really appreciated your response to me in the Great Full Versus N Titled post. You have no idea how helpful it was just then.

tintin said...

We went with the Domaine Serene which cut through the salt well but would have liked something cold. I'm thinking a bone dry cider from Farnum Hill would have nailed it.

We tried it a couple of ways. I soaked some slices in water for novices which I thought took away all the character. And I pan fried slices cut right off the leg. Those were my favorite but no so much with the others.

Country ham can be overwhelming if you didn't grow up on it. I like it sliced off the leg and pan fried. My dad, a Yankee, is a case in point for not.

However, it's a whole lot cheaper ($3 a pound) than prosciutto, serrano or speck and can easily replace those at $20 a pound and up. And it's made in the USA.

Gonna try sauted baby brussel sprouts with country ham slivers and a reduced balsamic vinegar this week.

Anon 13:32 I don't but I'm happy it did.

Anonymous said...

Farnum Hill? An Upper Valley favorite. Have you been to Poverty Lane? Speaking of buying local and small, isn't that pig from that farm featured in Food Inc?

Easy and Elegant Life said...

Oh man wish I'd gotten to this sooner. My father-in-law, the ex-UDT linguistics professor and tobacco salesman cooks one each year. The trick is to soak it (he does this in a specially made copper tub made for the purpose and in which his father mixed batches of martinis) for a couple of days, scrub it, glaze it and bake it.

As my Basque friend said, "why would you buy that plastic Italian *&^% when you have this?"